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THANK YOU FOR A WONDERFUL YEAR! OUR SEEDLING STORE IS CLOSED UNTIL THE SPRING!

Rainbow Swiss Chard

Rainbow Swiss Chard

$2.21

Somewhere Over The Rainbow!
Chard, or Swiss chard, is a variety of beet grown for its leaves and stalks rather than for its roots. This is the same species as beets, but does not form a swollen root, as beets do.  It is a great plant for the Tower Garden because of the intense red and yellow colour variations of its thick, crunchy stems.  
Chard has been cultivated since at least as far back as the ancient Greek empire, and it was grown around the Mediterranean, particularly in Sicily.  Although chard was extensively cultivated in Switzerland, it is also a staple of French cuisine, particularly from the regions of Lyon, Provence, and Corsica. The name “chard” comes to us from the Latin cardus, referring to the thistle (and artichoke), via the French word carde.
 
Growing / Harvesting
Similar to kale, our chard seedlings thrive in the Spring as temperatures move up and down constantly.  Leaves and roots are very colourful and leaves can be enjoyed as babies or after maturation.  We recommend harvesting once plant is fully grown as the leaves lose colour and grow into a woody texture.  Leaves and stalks can be
frozen immediately in airtight bags or containers.  Replant with another chard or a warmer weather plant.  Return to chard in the Fall or for indoor growing.
 
Ways To Enjoy
Chard is remarkably versatile in the kitchen, and can be steamed, sautéed, boiled, braised, or eaten raw.  When cooking it, treat the leaves as you would spinach and the stalks like asparagus. Chard, like regular beets, is spectacularly nutritious.  One cup of boiled chard contains nearly 110% of your daily recommended dose of vitamin A, half the daily dose of vitamin C, and very high amounts of vitamin, E, magnesium, manganese, potassium, and iron.  It is rich in protein and dietary fibre, as well.  Most of all, chard is intensely rich in vitamin K, which contributes to blood coagulation, bone metabolism, and vascular health.  That single cup of chard contains 7 times the recommended daily intake of vitamin K.  Like its sibling, the beet, chard is also high in anti-oxidants, which are good, and oxalic acid, which is not so good.  At least, over-indulging in food rich in oxalic acid can lead to kidney stones.
The possibilities are endless but our house favourite is a chard, olive and caper salad….YUM!